Reading Plan 

Bible Reading October 30

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Luke 14:1--17:37

Context
Healing Again on the Sabbath

14:1 Now 1  one Sabbath when Jesus went to dine 2  at the house of a leader 3  of the Pharisees, 4  they were watching 5  him closely. 14:2 There 6  right 7  in front of him was a man suffering from dropsy. 8  14:3 So 9  Jesus asked 10  the experts in religious law 11  and the Pharisees, “Is it lawful to heal on the Sabbath 12  or not?” 14:4 But they remained silent. So 13  Jesus 14  took hold of the man, 15  healed him, and sent him away. 16  14:5 Then 17  he said to them, “Which of you, if you have a son 18  or an ox that has fallen into a well on a Sabbath day, will not immediately pull him out?” 14:6 But 19  they could not reply 20  to this.

On Seeking Seats of Honor

14:7 Then 21  when Jesus 22  noticed how the guests 23  chose the places of honor, 24  he told them a parable. He said to them, 14:8 “When you are invited by someone to a wedding feast, 25  do not take 26  the place of honor, because a person more distinguished than you may have been invited by your host. 27  14:9 So 28  the host who invited both of you will come and say to you, ‘Give this man your place.’ Then, ashamed, 29  you will begin to move to the least important 30  place. 14:10 But when you are invited, go and take the least important place, so that when your host 31  approaches he will say to you, ‘Friend, move up here to a better place.’ 32  Then you will be honored in the presence of all who share the meal with you. 14:11 For everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, but 33  the one who humbles 34  himself will be exalted.”

14:12 He 35  said also to the man 36  who had invited him, “When you host a dinner or a banquet, 37  don’t invite your friends or your brothers or your relatives or rich neighbors so you can be invited by them in return and get repaid. 14:13 But when you host an elaborate meal, 38  invite the poor, the crippled, 39  the lame, and 40  the blind. 41  14:14 Then 42  you will be blessed, 43  because they cannot repay you, for you will be repaid 44  at the resurrection of the righteous.”

The Parable of the Great Banquet

14:15 When 45  one of those at the meal with Jesus 46  heard this, he said to him, “Blessed is everyone 47  who will feast 48  in the kingdom of God!” 49  14:16 But Jesus 50  said to him, “A man once gave a great banquet 51  and invited 52  many guests. 53  14:17 At 54  the time for the banquet 55  he sent his slave 56  to tell those who had been invited, ‘Come, because everything is now ready.’ 14:18 But one after another they all 57  began to make excuses. 58  The first said to him, ‘I have bought a field, 59  and I must go out and see it. Please excuse me.’ 60  14:19 Another 61  said, ‘I have bought five yoke of oxen, 62  and I am going out 63  to examine them. Please excuse me.’ 14:20 Another 64  said, ‘I just got married, and I cannot come.’ 65  14:21 So 66  the slave came back and reported this to his master. Then the master of the household was furious 67  and said to his slave, ‘Go out quickly 68  to the streets and alleys of the city, 69  and bring in the poor, 70  the crippled, 71  the blind, and the lame.’ 14:22 Then 72  the slave said, ‘Sir, what you instructed has been done, and there is still room.’ 73  14:23 So 74  the master said to his 75  slave, ‘Go out to the highways 76  and country roads 77  and urge 78  people 79  to come in, so that my house will be filled. 80  14:24 For I tell you, not one of those individuals 81  who were invited 82  will taste my banquet!’” 83 

Counting the Cost

14:25 Now large crowds 84  were accompanying Jesus, 85  and turning to them he said, 14:26 “If anyone comes to me and does not hate 86  his own father and mother, and wife and children, and brothers and sisters, and even his own life, 87  he cannot be my disciple. 14:27 Whoever does not carry his own cross 88  and follow 89  me cannot be my disciple. 14:28 For which of you, wanting to build a tower, doesn’t sit down 90  first and compute the cost 91  to see if he has enough money to complete it? 14:29 Otherwise, 92  when he has laid 93  a foundation and is not able to finish the tower, 94  all who see it 95  will begin to make fun of 96  him. 14:30 They will say, 97  ‘This man 98  began to build and was not able to finish!’ 99  14:31 Or what king, going out to confront another king in battle, will not sit down 100  first and determine whether he is able with ten thousand to oppose 101  the one coming against him with twenty thousand? 14:32 If he cannot succeed, 102  he will send a representative 103  while the other is still a long way off and ask for terms of peace. 104  14:33 In the same way therefore not one of you can be my disciple if he does not renounce all his own possessions. 105 

14:34 “Salt 106  is good, but if salt loses its flavor, 107  how can its flavor be restored? 14:35 It is of no value 108  for the soil or for the manure pile; it is to be thrown out. 109  The one who has ears to hear had better listen!” 110 

The Parable of the Lost Sheep and Coin

15:1 Now all the tax collectors 111  and sinners were coming 112  to hear him. 15:2 But 113  the Pharisees 114  and the experts in the law 115  were complaining, 116  “This man welcomes 117  sinners and eats with them.”

15:3 So 118  Jesus 119  told them 120  this parable: 121  15:4 “Which one 122  of you, if he has a hundred 123  sheep and loses one of them, would not leave the ninety-nine in the open pasture 124  and go look for 125  the one that is lost until he finds it? 126  15:5 Then 127  when he has found it, he places it on his shoulders, rejoicing. 15:6 Returning 128  home, he calls together 129  his 130  friends and neighbors, telling them, ‘Rejoice with me, because I have found my sheep that was lost.’ 15:7 I tell you, in the same way there will be more joy in heaven over one sinner 131  who repents than over ninety-nine righteous people 132  who have no need to repent. 133 

15:8 “Or what woman, if she has ten silver coins 134  and loses 135  one of them, 136  does not light a lamp, sweep 137  the house, and search thoroughly until she finds it? 15:9 Then 138  when she has found it, she calls together her 139  friends and neighbors, saying, ‘Rejoice 140  with me, for I have found the coin 141  that I had lost.’ 15:10 In the same way, I tell you, there is joy in the presence of God’s angels 142  over one sinner who repents.”

The Parable of the Compassionate Father

15:11 Then 143  Jesus 144  said, “A man had two sons. 15:12 The 145  younger of them said to his 146  father, ‘Father, give me the share of the estate 147  that will belong 148  to me.’ So 149  he divided his 150  assets between them. 151  15:13 After 152  a few days, 153  the younger son gathered together all he had and left on a journey to a distant country, and there he squandered 154  his wealth 155  with a wild lifestyle. 15:14 Then 156  after he had spent everything, a severe famine took place in that country, and he began to be in need. 15:15 So he went and worked for 157  one of the citizens of that country, who 158  sent him to his fields to feed pigs. 159  15:16 He 160  was longing to eat 161  the carob pods 162  the pigs were eating, but 163  no one gave him anything. 15:17 But when he came to his senses 164  he said, ‘How many of my father’s hired workers have food 165  enough to spare, but here I am dying from hunger! 15:18 I will get up and go to my father and say to him, “Father, I have sinned 166  against heaven 167  and against 168  you. 15:19 I am no longer worthy to be called your son; treat me 169  like one of your hired workers.”’ 15:20 So 170  he got up and went to his father. But while he was still a long way from home 171  his father saw him, and his heart went out to him; 172  he ran and hugged 173  his son 174  and kissed him. 15:21 Then 175  his son said to him, ‘Father, I have sinned against heaven 176  and against you; I am no longer worthy to be called your son.’ 177  15:22 But the father said to his slaves, 178  ‘Hurry! Bring the best robe, 179  and put it on him! Put a ring on his finger 180  and sandals 181  on his feet! 15:23 Bring 182  the fattened calf 183  and kill it! Let us eat 184  and celebrate, 15:24 because this son of mine was dead, and is alive again – he was lost and is found!’ 185  So 186  they began to celebrate.

15:25 “Now his older son was in the field. As 187  he came and approached the house, he heard music 188  and dancing. 15:26 So 189  he called one of the slaves 190  and asked what was happening. 15:27 The slave replied, 191  ‘Your brother has returned, and your father has killed the fattened calf 192  because he got his son 193  back safe and sound.’ 15:28 But the older son 194  became angry 195  and refused 196  to go in. His father came out and appealed to him, 15:29 but he answered 197  his father, ‘Look! These many years I have worked like a slave 198  for you, and I never disobeyed your commands. Yet 199  you never gave me even a goat 200  so that I could celebrate with my friends! 15:30 But when this son of yours 201  came back, who has devoured 202  your assets with prostitutes, 203  you killed the fattened calf 204  for him!’ 15:31 Then 205  the father 206  said to him, ‘Son, you are always with me, and everything that belongs to me is yours. 15:32 It was appropriate 207  to celebrate and be glad, for your brother 208  was dead, and is alive; he was lost and is found.’” 209 

The Parable of the Clever Steward

16:1 Jesus 210  also said to the disciples, “There was a rich man who was informed of accusations 211  that his manager 212  was wasting 213  his assets. 16:2 So 214  he called the manager 215  in and said to him, ‘What is this I hear about you? 216  Turn in the account of your administration, 217  because you can no longer be my manager.’ 16:3 Then 218  the manager said to himself, ‘What should I do, since my master is taking my position 219  away from me? I’m not strong enough to dig, 220  and I’m too ashamed 221  to beg. 16:4 I know 222  what to do so that when I am put out of management, people will welcome me into their homes.’ 223  16:5 So 224  he contacted 225  his master’s debtors one by one. He asked the first, ‘How much do you owe my master?’ 16:6 The man 226  replied, ‘A hundred measures 227  of olive oil.’ The manager 228  said to him, ‘Take your bill, sit down quickly, and write fifty.’ 229  16:7 Then he said to another, ‘And how much do you owe?’ The second man 230  replied, ‘A hundred measures 231  of wheat.’ The manager 232  said to him, ‘Take your bill, and write eighty.’ 233  16:8 The 234  master commended the dishonest 235  manager because he acted shrewdly. 236  For the people 237  of this world are more shrewd in dealing with their contemporaries 238  than the people 239  of light. 16:9 And I tell you, make friends for yourselves by how you use worldly wealth, 240  so that when it runs out you will be welcomed 241  into the eternal homes. 242 

16:10 “The one who is faithful in a very little 243  is also faithful in much, and the one who is dishonest in a very little is also dishonest in much. 16:11 If then you haven’t been trustworthy 244  in handling worldly wealth, 245  who will entrust you with the true riches? 246  16:12 And if you haven’t been trustworthy 247  with someone else’s property, 248  who will give you your own 249 ? 16:13 No servant can serve two masters, for either he will hate 250  the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise 251  the other. You cannot serve God and money.” 252 

More Warnings about the Pharisees

16:14 The Pharisees 253  (who loved money) heard all this and ridiculed 254  him. 16:15 But 255  Jesus 256  said to them, “You are the ones who justify yourselves in men’s eyes, 257  but God knows your hearts. For what is highly prized 258  among men is utterly detestable 259  in God’s sight.

16:16 “The law and the prophets were in force 260  until John; 261  since then, 262  the good news of the kingdom of God 263  has been proclaimed, and everyone is urged to enter it. 264  16:17 But it is easier for heaven and earth to pass away than for one tiny stroke of a letter 265  in the law to become void. 266 

16:18 “Everyone who divorces his wife and marries 267  someone else commits adultery, and the one who marries a woman divorced from her husband commits adultery.

The Rich Man and Lazarus

16:19 “There was a rich man who dressed in purple 268  and fine linen and who feasted sumptuously 269  every day. 16:20 But at his gate lay 270  a poor man named Lazarus 271  whose body was covered with sores, 272  16:21 who longed to eat 273  what fell from the rich man’s table. In addition, the dogs 274  came and licked 275  his sores.

16:22 “Now 276  the poor man died and was carried by the angels to Abraham’s side. 277  The 278  rich man also died and was buried. 279  16:23 And in hell, 280  as he was in torment, 281  he looked up 282  and saw Abraham far off with Lazarus at his side. 283  16:24 So 284  he called out, 285  ‘Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus 286  to dip the tip of his finger 287  in water and cool my tongue, because I am in anguish 288  in this fire.’ 289  16:25 But Abraham said, ‘Child, 290  remember that in your lifetime you received your good things and Lazarus likewise bad things, but now he is comforted here and you are in anguish. 291  16:26 Besides all this, 292  a great chasm 293  has been fixed between us, 294  so that those who want to cross over from here to you cannot do so, and no one can cross from there to us.’ 16:27 So 295  the rich man 296  said, ‘Then I beg you, father – send Lazarus 297  to my father’s house 16:28 (for I have five brothers) to warn 298  them so that they don’t come 299  into this place of torment.’ 16:29 But Abraham said, 300  ‘They have Moses and the prophets; they must respond to 301  them.’ 16:30 Then 302  the rich man 303  said, ‘No, father Abraham, but if someone from the dead 304  goes to them, they will repent.’ 16:31 He 305  replied to him, ‘If they do not respond to 306  Moses and the prophets, they will not be convinced even if someone rises from the dead.’” 307 

Sin, Forgiveness, Faith, and Service

17:1 Jesus 308  said to his disciples, “Stumbling blocks are sure to come, but woe 309  to the one through whom they come! 17:2 It would be better for him to have a millstone 310  tied around his neck and be thrown into the sea 311  than for him to cause one of these little ones to sin. 312  17:3 Watch 313  yourselves! If 314  your brother 315  sins, rebuke him. If 316  he repents, forgive him. 17:4 Even if he sins against you seven times in a day, and seven times returns to you saying, ‘I repent,’ you must forgive 317  him.”

17:5 The 318  apostles said to the Lord, “Increase our faith!” 319  17:6 So 320  the Lord replied, 321  “If 322  you had faith the size of 323  a mustard seed, you could say to this black mulberry 324  tree, ‘Be pulled out by the roots and planted in the sea,’ 325  and it would obey 326  you.

17:7 “Would any one of you say 327  to your slave 328  who comes in from the field after plowing or shepherding sheep, ‘Come at once and sit down for a meal’? 329  17:8 Won’t 330  the master 331  instead say to him, ‘Get my dinner ready, and make yourself ready 332  to serve me while 333  I eat and drink. Then 334  you may eat and drink’? 17:9 He won’t thank the slave because he did what he was told, 335  will he? 336  17:10 So you too, when you have done everything you were commanded to do, should say, ‘We are slaves undeserving of special praise; 337  we have only done what was our duty.’” 338 

The Grateful Leper

17:11 Now on 339  the way to Jerusalem, 340  Jesus 341  was passing along 342  between Samaria and Galilee. 17:12 As 343  he was entering 344  a village, ten men with leprosy 345  met him. They 346  stood at a distance, 17:13 raised their voices and said, “Jesus, Master, have mercy 347  on us.” 17:14 When 348  he saw them he said, “Go 349  and show yourselves to the priests.” 350  And 351  as they went along, they were cleansed. 17:15 Then one of them, when he saw he was healed, turned back, praising 352  God with a loud voice. 17:16 He 353  fell with his face to the ground 354  at Jesus’ feet and thanked him. 355  (Now 356  he was a Samaritan.) 357  17:17 Then 358  Jesus said, 359  “Were 360  not ten cleansed? Where are the other 361  nine? 17:18 Was no one found to turn back and give praise to God except this foreigner?” 362  17:19 Then 363  he said to the man, 364  “Get up and go your way. Your faith has made you well.” 365 

The Coming of the Kingdom

17:20 Now at one point 366  the Pharisees 367  asked Jesus 368  when the kingdom of God 369  was coming, so he answered, “The kingdom of God is not coming with signs 370  to be observed, 17:21 nor will they say, ‘Look, here it is!’ or ‘There!’ For indeed, the kingdom of God is 371  in your midst.” 372 

The Coming of the Son of Man

17:22 Then 373  he said to the disciples, “The days are coming when you will desire to see one of the days 374  of the Son of Man, and you will not see it. 17:23 Then people 375  will say to you, ‘Look, there he is!’ 376  or ‘Look, here he is!’ Do not go out or chase after them. 377  17:24 For just like the lightning flashes 378  and lights up the sky from one side to the other, so will the Son of Man be in his day. 379  17:25 But first he must 380  suffer many things and be rejected by this generation. 17:26 Just 381  as it was 382  in the days of Noah, 383  so too it will be in the days of the Son of Man. 17:27 People 384  were eating, 385  they were drinking, they were marrying, they were being given in marriage – right up to the day Noah entered the ark. Then 386  the flood came and destroyed them all. 387  17:28 Likewise, just as it was 388  in the days of Lot, people 389  were eating, drinking, buying, selling, planting, building; 17:29 but on the day Lot went out from Sodom, fire and sulfur rained down from heaven and destroyed them all. 390  17:30 It will be the same on the day the Son of Man is revealed. 17:31 On that day, anyone who is on the roof, 391  with his goods in the house, must not come down 392  to take them away, and likewise the person in the field must not turn back. 17:32 Remember Lot’s wife! 393  17:33 Whoever tries to keep 394  his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life 395  will preserve it. 17:34 I tell you, in that night there will be two people in one bed; one will be taken and the other left. 396  17:35 There will be two women grinding grain together; 397  one will be taken and the other left.”

17:36 [[EMPTY]] 398 

17:37 Then 399  the disciples 400  said 401  to him, “Where, 402  Lord?” He replied to them, “Where the dead body 403  is, there the vultures 404  will gather.” 405 

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[14:1]  1 tn Grk “Now it happened that one.” The introductory phrase ἐγένετο (egeneto, “it happened that”), common in Luke (69 times) and Acts (54 times), is redundant in contemporary English and has not been translated. Here καί (kai) has been translated as “now” to indicate the transition to a new topic.

[14:1]  2 tn Grk “to eat bread,” an idiom for participating in a meal.

[14:1]  3 tn Grk “a ruler of the Pharisees.” He was probably a synagogue official.

[14:1]  4 sn See the note on Pharisees in 5:17.

[14:1]  5 sn Watching…closely is a graphic term meaning to lurk and watch; see Luke 11:53-54.

[14:2]  6 tn Grk “And there.” Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

[14:2]  7 tn Grk “behold.” The Greek word ἰδού (idou) at the beginning of this statement adds interest and emphasis (BDAG 468 s.v. 1). Here it has been translated as “right” in the phrase “right in front of him,” giving a similar effect of vividness in the translation.

[14:2]  8 sn The condition called dropsy involves swollen limbs resulting from the accumulation of fluid in the body’s tissues, especially the legs.

[14:3]  9 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “so” to indicate the sequence of events (Jesus’ question was prompted by the man’s appearance).

[14:3]  10 tn Grk “Jesus, answering, said.” This is redundant in contemporary English. In addition, since the context does not describe a previous question to Jesus (although one may well be implied), the phrase has been translated here as “Jesus asked.”

[14:3]  11 tn That is, experts in the interpretation of the Mosaic law (traditionally, “lawyers”).

[14:3]  12 snIs it lawful to heal on the Sabbath or not?” Will the Pharisees and experts in religious law defend tradition and speak out against doing good on the Sabbath? Has anything at all been learned since Luke 13:10-17? Has repentance come (13:6-9)?

[14:4]  13 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “so” to indicate the sequence of events (Jesus’ healing the man was in response to their refusal to answer).

[14:4]  14 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[14:4]  15 tn Grk “taking hold [of the man].” The participle ἐπιλαβόμενος (epilabomeno") has been taken as indicating attendant circumstance.

[14:4]  16 tn Or “and let him go.”

[14:5]  17 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

[14:5]  18 tc Here “son,” found in Ì45,75 (A) B W Ï, is the preferred reading. The other reading, “donkey” (found in א K L Ψ Ë1,13 33 579 892 1241 2542 al lat bo), looks like an assimilation to Luke 13:15 and Deut 22:4; Isa 32:20, and was perhaps motivated by an attempt to soften the unusual collocation of “son” and “ox.” The Western ms D differs from all others and reads “sheep.”

[14:6]  19 tn καί (kai) has been translated here as “but” to indicate the contrast present in this context. The experts, who should be expected to know the law, are unable to respond to Jesus’ question.

[14:6]  20 sn They could not reply. Twice in the scene, the experts remain silent (see v. 4). That, along with the presence of power working through Jesus, serves to indicate endorsement of his work and message.

[14:7]  21 tn Here δέ (de) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

[14:7]  22 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[14:7]  23 tn Grk “those who were invited.”

[14:7]  24 tn Or “the best places.” The “places of honor” at the meal would be those closest to the host.

[14:8]  25 tn Or “banquet.” This may not refer only to a wedding feast, because this term can have broader sense (note the usage in Esth 2:18; 9:22 LXX). However, this difference does not affect the point of the parable.

[14:8]  26 tn Grk “do not recline in the place of honor.” 1st century middle eastern meals were not eaten while sitting at a table, but while reclining on one’s side on the floor with the head closest to the low table and the feet farthest away.

[14:8]  27 tn Grk “by him”; the referent (the host) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[14:9]  28 tn Grk “host, and.” Here καί (kai) has been translated as “so” to indicate this action is a result of the situation described in the previous verse. Because of the length and complexity of the Greek sentence, a new sentence was started here in the translation.

[14:9]  29 tn Or “then in disgrace”; Grk “with shame.” In this culture avoiding shame was important.

[14:9]  30 tn Grk “lowest place” (also in the repetition of the phrase in the next verse).

[14:10]  31 tn Grk “the one who invited you.”

[14:10]  32 tn Grk “Go up higher.” This means to move to a more important place.

[14:11]  33 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “but” to indicate the contrast present in this context, which involves the reversal of expected roles.

[14:11]  34 sn The point of the statement the one who humbles himself will be exalted is humility and the reversal imagery used to underline it is common: Luke 1:52-53; 6:21; 10:15; 18:14.

[14:12]  35 tn Here δέ (de) has not been translated.

[14:12]  36 sn That is, the leader of the Pharisees (v. 1).

[14:12]  37 tn The meaning of the two terms for meals here, ἄριστον (ariston) and δεῖπνον (deipnon), essentially overlap (L&N 23.22). Translators usually try to find two terms for a meal to use as equivalents (e.g., lunch and dinner, dinner and supper, etc.). In this translation “dinner” and “banquet” have been used, since the expected presence of rich neighbors later in the verse suggests a rather more elaborate occasion than an ordinary meal.

[14:13]  38 tn This term, δοχή (doch), is a third term for a meal (see v. 12) that could also be translated “banquet, feast.”

[14:13]  39 sn Normally the term means crippled as a result of being maimed or mutilated (L&N 23.177).

[14:13]  40 tn Here “and” has been supplied between the last two elements in the series in keeping with English style.

[14:13]  41 sn This list of needy is like Luke 7:22. See Deut 14:28-29; 16:11-14; 26:11-13.

[14:14]  42 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate that this follows from the preceding action. Because of the length and complexity of the Greek sentence, a new sentence was started here in the translation.

[14:14]  43 sn You will be blessed. God notes and approves of such generosity.

[14:14]  44 sn The passive verb will be repaid looks at God’s commendation.

[14:15]  45 tn Here δέ (de) has not been translated.

[14:15]  46 tn Grk “him”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[14:15]  47 tn Grk “whoever” (the indefinite relative pronoun). This has been translated as “everyone who” to conform to contemporary English style.

[14:15]  48 tn Or “will dine”; Grk “eat bread.” This refers to those who enjoy the endless fellowship of God’s coming rule.

[14:15]  49 sn The kingdom of God is a major theme of Jesus. It is a realm in which Jesus rules and to which those who trust him belong. See Luke 6:20; 11:20; 17:20-21.

[14:16]  50 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[14:16]  51 tn Or “dinner.”

[14:16]  52 sn Presumably those invited would have sent a reply with the invitation stating their desire to attend, much like a modern R.S.V.P. Then they waited for the servant to announce the beginning of the celebration (D. L. Bock, Luke [BECNT], 2:1272).

[14:16]  53 tn The word “guests” is not in the Greek text but is implied.

[14:17]  54 tn Grk “And at.” Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

[14:17]  55 tn Or “dinner.”

[14:17]  56 tn See the note on the word “slave” in 7:2.

[14:18]  57 tn Or “all unanimously” (BDAG 107 s.v. ἀπό 6). "One after another" is suggested by L&N 61.2.

[14:18]  58 sn To make excuses and cancel at this point was an insult in the culture of the time. Regardless of customs concerning responses to invitations, refusal at this point was rude.

[14:18]  59 sn I have bought a field. An examination of newly bought land was a common practice. It was this person’s priority.

[14:18]  60 sn The expression Please excuse me is probably a polite way of refusing, given the dynamics of the situation, although it is important to note that an initial acceptance had probably been indicated and it was now a bit late for a refusal. The semantic equivalent of the phrase may well be “please accept my apologies.”

[14:19]  61 tn Grk “And another.” Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

[14:19]  62 sn Five yoke of oxen. This was a wealthy man, because the normal farmer had one or two yoke of oxen.

[14:19]  63 tn The translation “going out” for πορεύομαι (poreuomai) is used because “going” in this context could be understood to mean “I am about to” rather than the correct nuance, “I am on my way to.”

[14:20]  64 tn Grk “And another.” Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

[14:20]  65 sn I just got married, and I cannot come. There is no request to be excused here; just a refusal. Why this disqualifies attendance is not clear. The OT freed a newly married man from certain responsibilities such as serving in the army (Deut 20:7; 24:5), but that would hardly apply to a banquet. The invitation is not respected in any of the three cases.

[14:21]  66 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “so” to indicate the result of the preceding responses.

[14:21]  67 tn Grk “being furious, said.” The participle ὀργισθείς (orgisqei") has been translated as a finite verb due to requirements of contemporary English style.

[14:21]  68 sn It was necessary to go out quickly because the banquet was already prepared. All the food would spoil if not eaten immediately.

[14:21]  69 tn Or “town.”

[14:21]  70 sn The poor, the crippled, the blind and the lame. Note how the list matches v. 13, illustrating that point. Note also how the party goes on; it is not postponed until a later date. Instead new guests are invited.

[14:21]  71 tn Grk “and the crippled.” Normally crippled as a result of being maimed or mutilated (L&N 23.177). Καί (kai) has not been translated here and before the following category (Grk “and the blind and the lame”) since English normally uses a coordinating conjunction only between the last two elements in a series of three or more.

[14:22]  72 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the order of events within the parable.

[14:22]  73 sn And still there is room. This comment suggests the celebration was quite a big one, picturing the openness of God’s grace.

[14:23]  74 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “so” to indicate the master’s response to the slave’s report.

[14:23]  75 tn Grk “the”; in context the article is used as a possessive pronoun (ExSyn 215).

[14:23]  76 sn Go out to the highways and country roads. This suggests the inclusion of people outside the town, even beyond the needy (poor, crippled, blind, and lame) in the town, and so is an allusion to the inclusion of the Gentiles.

[14:23]  77 tn The Greek word φραγμός (fragmo") refers to a fence, wall, or hedge surrounding a vineyard (BDAG 1064 s.v. 1). “Highways” and “country roads” probably refer not to separate places, but to the situation outside the town where the rural roads run right alongside the hedges or fences surrounding the fields (cf. J. A. Fitzmyer, Luke [AB], 1057).

[14:23]  78 tn Traditionally “force” or “compel,” but according to BDAG 60 s.v. ἀναγκάζω 2 this is a weakened nuance: “strongly urge/invite.” The meaning in this context is more like “persuade.”

[14:23]  79 tn The word “people” is not in the Greek text, but is implied. Direct objects were frequently omitted in Greek when clear from the context.

[14:23]  80 sn So that my house will be filled. God will bless many people.

[14:24]  81 tn The Greek word here is ἀνήρ (anhr), which frequently stresses males or husbands (in contrast to women or wives). However, the emphasis in the present context is on identifying these individuals as the ones previously invited, examples of which were given in vv. 18-20. Cf. also BDAG 79 s.v. ἀνήρ 2.

[14:24]  82 sn None of those individuals who were invited. This is both the point and the warning. To be a part of the original invitation does not mean one automatically has access to blessing. One must respond when the summons comes in order to participate. The summons came in the person of Jesus and his proclamation of the kingdom. The statement here refers to the fact that many in Israel will not be blessed with participation, for they have ignored the summons when it came.

[14:24]  83 tn Or “dinner.”

[14:25]  84 sn It is important to note that the following remarks are not just to disciples, but to the large crowds who were following Jesus.

[14:25]  85 tn Grk “him”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[14:26]  86 tn This figurative use operates on a relative scale. God is to be loved more than family or self.

[14:26]  87 tn Grk “his own soul,” but ψυχή (yuch) is frequently used of one’s physical life. It clearly has that meaning in this context.

[14:27]  88 sn It was customary practice in a Roman crucifixion for the prisoner to be made to carry his own cross. Jesus is speaking figuratively here in the context of rejection. If the priority is not one’s allegiance to Jesus, then one will not follow him in the face of possible rejection; see Luke 9:23.

[14:27]  89 tn Grk “and come after.” In combination with the verb ἔρχομαι (ercomai) the improper preposition ὀπίσω (opisw) means “follow.”

[14:28]  90 tn The participle καθίσας (kaqisas) has been translated as a finite verb due to requirements of contemporary English style.

[14:28]  91 tn The first illustration involves checking to see if enough funds exist to build a watchtower. Both ψηφίζω (yhfizw, “compute”) and δαπάνη (dapanh, “cost”) are economic terms.

[14:29]  92 tn Grk “to complete it, lest.” Because of the length and complexity of the Greek sentence, a new sentence was started here in the translation and ἵνα μήποτε ({ina mhpote, “lest”) has been translated as “Otherwise.”

[14:29]  93 tn The participle θέντος (qentos) has been taken temporally.

[14:29]  94 tn The words “the tower” are not in the Greek text, but are implied. Direct objects were frequently omitted in Greek when clear from the context.

[14:29]  95 tn The word “it” is not in the Greek text, but is implied. Direct objects were frequently omitted in Greek when clear from the context.

[14:29]  96 tn Or “mock,” “ridicule.” The person who did not plan ahead becomes an object of joking and ridicule.

[14:30]  97 tn Grk “make fun of him, saying.”

[14:30]  98 sn The phrase this man is often used in Luke in a derogatory sense; see “this one” and expressions like it in Luke 5:21; 7:39; 13:32; 23:4, 14, 22, 35.

[14:30]  99 sn The failure to finish the building project leads to embarrassment (in a culture where avoiding public shame was extremely important). The half completed tower testified to poor preparation and planning.

[14:31]  100 tn The participle καθίσας (kaqisa") has been translated as a finite verb due to requirements of contemporary English style.

[14:31]  101 tn On the meaning of this verb see also L&N 55.3, “to meet in battle, to face in battle.”

[14:32]  102 tn Grk “And if not.” Here δέ (de) has not been translated; “succeed” is implied and has been supplied in the translation for clarity.

[14:32]  103 tn Grk “a messenger.”

[14:32]  104 sn This image is slightly different from the former one about the tower (vv. 28-30). The first part of the illustration (sit down first and determine) deals with preparation. The second part of the illustration (ask for terms of peace) has to do with recognizing who is stronger. This could well suggest thinking about what refusing the “stronger one” (God) might mean, and thus constitutes a warning. Achieving peace with God, the more powerful king, is the point of the illustration.

[14:33]  105 tn Grk “Likewise therefore every one of you who does not renounce all his own possessions cannot be my disciple.” The complex double negation is potentially confusing to the modern reader and has been simplified in the translation. See L&N 57.70.

[14:34]  106 tn Grk “Now salt…”; here οὖν has not been translated.

[14:34]  107 sn The difficulty of this saying is understanding how salt could lose its flavor since its chemical properties cannot change. It is thus often assumed that Jesus was referring to chemically impure salt, perhaps a natural salt which, when exposed to the elements, had all the genuine salt leached out, leaving only the sediment or impurities behind. Others have suggested the background of the saying is the use of salt blocks by Arab bakers to line the floor of their ovens: Under the intense heat these blocks would eventually crystallize and undergo a change in chemical composition, finally being thrown out as unserviceable. A saying in the Talmud (b. Bekhorot 8b) attributed to R. Joshua ben Chananja (ca. a.d. 90), when asked the question “When salt loses its flavor, how can it be made salty again?” is said to have replied, “By salting it with the afterbirth of a mule.” He was then asked, “Then does the mule (being sterile) bear young?” to which he replied: “Can salt lose its flavor?” The point appears to be, both are impossible. The saying, while admittedly late, suggests that culturally the loss of flavor by salt was regarded as an impossibility. Genuine salt can never lose its flavor. In this case the saying by Jesus here may be similar to Matt 19:24, where it is likewise impossible for the camel to go through the eye of a sewing needle.

[14:35]  108 tn Or “It is not useful” (L&N 65.32).

[14:35]  109 tn Grk “they throw it out.” The third person plural with unspecified subject is a circumlocution for the passive here.

[14:35]  110 tn The translation “had better listen!” captures the force of the third person imperative more effectively than the traditional “let him hear,” which sounds more like a permissive than an imperative to the modern English reader. This was Jesus’ common expression to listen and heed carefully (cf. Matt 11:15; 13:9, 43; Mark 4:9, 23; Luke 8:8).

[15:1]  111 sn See the note on tax collectors in 3:12.

[15:1]  112 tn Grk “were drawing near.”

[15:2]  113 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “but” to indicate the contrast present in this context.

[15:2]  114 sn See the note on Pharisees in 5:17.

[15:2]  115 tn Or “and the scribes.” See the note on the phrase “experts in the law” in 5:21.

[15:2]  116 tn Or “grumbling”; Grk “were complaining, saying.” The participle λέγοντες (legontes) is redundant in contemporary English and has not been translated.

[15:2]  117 tn Or “accepts,” “receives.” This is not the first time this issue has been raised: Luke 5:27-32; 7:37-50.

[15:3]  118 tn Here δέ (de) has been translated as “so” to indicate that Jesus’ telling of the parable is in response to the complaints of the Pharisees and experts in the law.

[15:3]  119 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[15:3]  120 sn Them means at the minimum the parable is for the leadership, but probably also for those people Jesus accepted, but the leaders regarded as outcasts.

[15:3]  121 tn Grk “parable, saying.” The participle λέγων (legwn) is redundant in contemporary English and has not been translated.

[15:4]  122 tn Grk “What man.” The Greek word ἄνθρωπος (anqrwpo") is used here in a somewhat generic sense.

[15:4]  123 sn This individual with a hundred sheep is a shepherd of modest means, as flocks often had up to two hundred head of sheep.

[15:4]  124 tn Or “desert,” but here such a translation might suggest neglect of the 99 sheep left behind.

[15:4]  125 tn Grk “go after,” but in contemporary English the idiom “to look for” is used to express this.

[15:4]  126 sn Until he finds it. The parable pictures God’s pursuit of the sinner. On the image of Jesus as the Good Shepherd, see John 10:1-18.

[15:5]  127 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

[15:6]  128 tn Grk “And coming into his…” Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

[15:6]  129 sn A touch of drama may be present, as the term calls together can mean a formal celebration (1 Kgs 1:9-10).

[15:6]  130 tn Grk “the”; in context the article is used as a possessive pronoun (ExSyn 215). It occurs before “neighbors” as well (“his friends and his neighbors”) but has not been translated the second time because of English style.

[15:7]  131 sn There will be more joy in heaven over one sinner who repents. The pursuit of the sinner is a priority in spite of the presence of others who are doing well (see also Luke 5:32; 19:10). The theme of repentance, a major Lukan theme, is again emphasized.

[15:7]  132 tn Here δικαίοις (dikaioi") is an adjective functioning substantivally and has been translated “righteous people.”

[15:7]  133 tn Or “who do not need to repent”; Grk “who do not have need of repentance.”

[15:8]  134 sn This silver coin is a drachma, equal to a denarius, that is, a day’s pay for the average laborer.

[15:8]  135 tn Grk “What woman who has ten silver coins, if she loses.” The initial participle ἔχουσα (ecousa) has been translated as a finite verb parallel to ἀπολέσῃ (apolesh) in the conditional clause to improve the English style.

[15:8]  136 tn Grk “one coin.”

[15:8]  137 tn Grk “and sweep,” but καί (kai) has not been translated since English normally uses a coordinating conjunction only between the last two elements in a series of three or more.

[15:9]  138 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

[15:9]  139 tn Grk “the”; in context the article is used as a possessive pronoun (ExSyn 215).

[15:9]  140 sn Rejoice. Besides the theme of pursuing the lost, the other theme of the parable is the joy of finding them.

[15:9]  141 tn Grk “drachma.”

[15:10]  142 sn The whole of heaven is said to rejoice. Joy in the presence of God’s angels is a way of referring to God’s joy as well without having to name him explicitly. Contemporary Judaism tended to refer to God indirectly where possible out of reverence or respect for the divine name.

[15:11]  143 tn Here δέ (de) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

[15:11]  144 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[15:12]  145 tn Grk “And the.” Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

[15:12]  146 tn Grk “the”; in context the article is used as a possessive pronoun (ExSyn 215).

[15:12]  147 tn L&N 57.19 notes that in nonbiblical contexts in which the word οὐσία (ousia) occurs, it refers to considerable possessions or wealth, thus “estate.”

[15:12]  148 tn L&N 57.3, “to belong to or come to belong to, with the possible implication of by right or by inheritance.”

[15:12]  149 tn Here δέ (de) has been translated as “so” to indicate the father’s response to the younger son’s request.

[15:12]  150 tn Grk “the”; in context the article is used as a possessive pronoun (ExSyn 215).

[15:12]  151 sn He divided his assets between them. There was advice against doing this in the OT Apocrypha (Sir 33:20). The younger son would get half of what the older son received (Deut 21:17).

[15:13]  152 tn Grk “And after.” Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

[15:13]  153 tn Grk “after not many days.”

[15:13]  154 tn Or “wasted.” This verb is graphic; it means to scatter (L&N 57.151).

[15:13]  155 tn Or “estate” (the same word has been translated “estate” in v. 12).

[15:14]  156 tn Here δέ (de) has been translated as “then” to indicate the sequence of events in the parable. Greek style often begins sentences or clauses with “and,” but English style generally does not.

[15:15]  157 tn Grk “joined himself to” (in this case an idiom for beginning to work for someone).

[15:15]  158 tn Grk “and he.” Here the conjunction καί (kai) and the personal pronoun have been translated by a relative pronoun to improve the English style.

[15:15]  159 sn To a Jew, being sent to the field to feed pigs would be an insult, since pigs were considered unclean animals (Lev 11:7).

[15:16]  160 tn Grk “And he.” Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

[15:16]  161 tn Or “would gladly have eaten”; Grk “was longing to be filled with.”

[15:16]  162 tn This term refers to the edible pods from a carob tree (BDAG 540 s.v. κεράτιον). They were bean-like in nature and were commonly used for fattening pigs, although they were also used for food by poor people (L&N 3.46).

[15:16]  163 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “but” to indicate the contrast present in this context.

[15:17]  164 tn Grk “came to himself” (an idiom).

[15:17]  165 tn Grk “bread,” but used figuratively for food of any kind (L&N 5.1).

[15:18]  166 sn In the confession “I have sinned” there is a recognition of wrong that pictures the penitent coming home and “being found.”

[15:18]  167 sn The phrase against heaven is a circumlocution for God.

[15:18]  168 tn According to BDAG 342 s.v. ἐνωπιον 4.a, “in relation to ἁμαρτάνειν ἐ. τινος sin against someone Lk 15:18, 21 (cf. Jdth 5:17; 1 Km 7:6; 20:1).”

[15:19]  169 tn Or “make me.” Here is a sign of total humility.

[15:20]  170 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “so” to indicate the result of the son’s decision to return home. Greek style often begins sentences or clauses with “and,” but English style generally does not.

[15:20]  171 tn Grk “a long way off from [home].” The word “home” is implied (L&N 85.16).

[15:20]  172 tn Or “felt great affection for him,” “felt great pity for him.”

[15:20]  173 tn Grk “he fell on his neck,” an idiom for showing special affection for someone by throwing one’s arms around them. The picture is of the father hanging on the son’s neck in welcome.

[15:20]  174 tn Grk “him”; the referent (the son) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[15:21]  175 tn Here δέ (de) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

[15:21]  176 sn The phrase against heaven is a circumlocution for God. 1st century Judaism tended to minimize use of the divine name out of reverence.

[15:21]  177 sn The younger son launches into his confession just as he had planned. See vv. 18-19.

[15:22]  178 tn See the note on the word “slave” in 7:2.

[15:22]  179 sn With the instructions Hurry! Bring the best robe, there is a total acceptance of the younger son back into the home.

[15:22]  180 tn Grk “hand”; but χείρ (ceir) can refer to either the whole hand or any relevant part of it (L&N 8.30).

[15:22]  181 sn The need for sandals underlines the younger son’s previous destitution, because he was barefoot.

[15:23]  182 tn Grk “And bring.” Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style. Because of the length and complexity of the Greek sentence, a new sentence was started here in the translation.

[15:23]  183 tn Or “the prize calf” (L&N 65.8). See also L&N 44.2, “grain-fattened.” Such a calf was usually reserved for religious celebrations.

[15:23]  184 tn The participle φαγόντες (fagontes) has been translated as a finite verb due to requirements of contemporary English style.

[15:24]  185 sn This statement links the parable to the theme of 15:6, 9.

[15:24]  186 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “so” to indicate the result of the father’s remarks in the preceding verses.

[15:25]  187 tn Grk “And as.” Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

[15:25]  188 sn This would have been primarily instrumental music, but might include singing as well.

[15:26]  189 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “so” to indicate the result of the older son hearing the noise of the celebration in progress.

[15:26]  190 tn The Greek term here, παῖς (pais), describes a slave, possibly a household servant regarded with some affection (L&N 87.77).

[15:27]  191 tn Grk “And he said to him.” Here δέ (de) has not been translated. The rest of the phrase has been simplified to “the slave replied,” with the referent (the slave) specified in the translation for clarity.

[15:27]  192 tn See note on the phrase “fattened calf” in v. 23.

[15:27]  193 tn Grk “him”; the referent (the younger son) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[15:28]  194 tn Grk “he”; the referent (the older son, v. 25) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[15:28]  195 tn The aorist verb ὠργίσθη (wrgisqh) has been translated as an ingressive aorist, reflecting entry into a state or condition.

[15:28]  196 sn Ironically the attitude of the older son has left him outside and without joy.

[15:29]  197 tn Grk “but answering, he said.” This is somewhat redundant in contemporary English and has been simplified to “but he answered.”

[15:29]  198 tn Or simply, “have served,” but in the emotional context of the older son’s outburst the translation given is closer to the point.

[15:29]  199 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “yet” to bring out the contrast indicated by the context.

[15:29]  200 sn You never gave me even a goat. The older son’s complaint was that the generous treatment of the younger son was not fair: “I can’t get even a little celebration with a basic food staple like a goat!”

[15:30]  201 sn Note the younger son is not “my brother” but this son of yours (an expression with a distinctly pejorative nuance).

[15:30]  202 sn This is another graphic description. The younger son’s consumption had been like a glutton. He had both figuratively and literally devoured the assets which were given to him.

[15:30]  203 sn The charge concerning the prostitutes is unproven, but essentially the older brother accuses the father of committing an injustice by rewarding his younger son’s unrighteous behavior.

[15:30]  204 sn See note on the phrase “fattened calf” in v. 23.

[15:31]  205 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events in the parable.

[15:31]  206 tn Grk “he”; the referent (the father) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[15:32]  207 tn Or “necessary.”

[15:32]  208 sn By referring to him as your brother, the father reminded the older brother that the younger brother was part of the family.

[15:32]  209 sn The theme he was lost and is found is repeated from v. 24. The conclusion is open-ended. The reader is left to ponder with the older son (who pictures the scribes and Pharisees) what the response will be. The parable does not reveal the ultimate response of the older brother. Jesus argued that sinners should be pursued and received back warmly when they returned.

[16:1]  210 tn Grk “He”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[16:1]  211 tn These are not formal legal charges, but reports from friends, acquaintances, etc.; Grk “A certain man was rich who had a manager, and this one was reported to him as wasting his property.”

[16:1]  212 sn His manager was the steward in charge of managing the house. He could have been a slave trained for the role.

[16:1]  213 tn Or “squandering.” This verb is graphic; it means to scatter (L&N 57.151).

[16:2]  214 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “so” to indicate the result of the reports the man received about his manager.

[16:2]  215 tn Grk “him”; the referent (the manager) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[16:2]  216 sn Although phrased as a question, the charges were believed by the owner, as his dismissal of the manager implies.

[16:2]  217 tn Or “stewardship”; the Greek word οἰκονομία (oikonomia) is cognate with the noun for the manager (οἰκονόμος, oikonomo").

[16:3]  218 tn Here δέ (de) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events in the parable.

[16:3]  219 tn Grk “the stewardship,” “the management.”

[16:3]  220 tn Here “dig” could refer (1) to excavation (“dig ditches,” L&N 19.55) or (2) to agricultural labor (“work the soil,” L&N 43.3). In either case this was labor performed by the uneducated, so it would be an insult as a job for a manager.

[16:3]  221 tn Grk “I do not have strength to dig; I am ashamed to beg.”

[16:4]  222 tn This is a dramatic use of the aorist and the verse is left unconnected to the previous verse by asyndeton, giving the impression of a sudden realization.

[16:4]  223 sn Thinking ahead, the manager develops a plan to make people think kindly of him (welcome me into their homes).

[16:5]  224 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “so” to indicate the result of the manager’s decision.

[16:5]  225 tn Grk “summoning.” The participle προσκαλεσάμενος (proskalesameno") has been translated as a finite verb due to requirements of contemporary English style.

[16:6]  226 tn Grk “He”; the referent (the first debtor) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[16:6]  227 sn A measure (sometimes translated “bath”) was just over 8 gallons (about 30 liters). This is a large debt – about 875 gallons (3000 liters) of olive oil, worth 1000 denarii, over three year’s pay for a daily worker.

[16:6]  228 tn Grk “He”; the referent (the manager) has been specified in the translation for clarity. Here δέ (de) has not been translated for stylistic reasons.

[16:6]  229 sn The bill was halved (sit down quickly, and write fifty). What was the steward doing? This is debated. 1) Did he simply lower the price? 2) Did he remove interest from the debt? 3) Did he remove his own commission? It is hard to be sure. Either of the latter two options is more likely. The goal was clear: The manager would be seen in a favorable light for bringing a deflationary trend to prices.

[16:7]  230 tn Grk “He”; the referent (the second debtor) has been specified in the translation for clarity. Here δέ (de) has not been translated for stylistic reasons.

[16:7]  231 sn The hundred measures here was a hundreds cors. A cor was a Hebrew dry measure for grain, flour, etc., of between 10-12 bushels (about 390 liters). This was a huge amount of wheat, representing the yield of about 100 acres, a debt of between 2500-3000 denarii.

[16:7]  232 tn Grk “He”; the referent (the manager) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[16:7]  233 sn The percentage of reduction may not be as great because of the change in material.

[16:8]  234 tn Grk “And the.” Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

[16:8]  235 sn Is the manager dishonest because of what he just did? Or is it a reference to what he had done earlier, described in v. 1? This is a difficult question, but it seems unlikely that the master, having fired the man for prior dishonesty, would now commend those same actions. It would also be unusual for Jesus to make that point of the story the example. Thus it is more likely the reference to dishonesty goes back to the earliest events, while the commendation is for the cleverness of the former manager reflected in vv. 5-7.

[16:8]  236 sn Where this parable ends is debated: Does it conclude with v. 7, after v. 8a, after v. 8b, or after v. 9? Verse 8a looks as if it is still part of the story, with its clear reference to the manager, while 8b looks like Jesus’ application, since its remarks are more general. So it is most likely the parable stops after v. 8a.

[16:8]  237 tn Grk “sons” (an idiom).

[16:8]  238 tn Grk “with their own generation.”

[16:8]  239 tn Grk “sons.” Here the phrase “sons of light” is a reference to the righteous. The point is that those of the world often think ahead about consequences better than the righteous do.

[16:9]  240 tn Grk “unrighteous mammon.” Mammon is the Aramaic term for wealth or possessions. The point is not that money is inherently evil, but that it is often misused so that it is a means of evil; see 1 Tim 6:6-10, 17-19. The call is to be generous and kind in its use. Zacchaeus becomes the example of this in Luke’s Gospel (19:1-10).

[16:9]  241 sn The passive refers to the welcome of heaven.

[16:9]  242 tn Grk “eternal tents” (as dwelling places).

[16:10]  243 sn The point of the statement faithful in a very little is that character is shown in how little things are treated.

[16:11]  244 tn Or “faithful.”

[16:11]  245 tn Grk “the unrighteous mammon.” See the note on the phrase “worldly wealth” in v. 9.

[16:11]  246 sn Entrust you with the true riches is a reference to future service for God. The idea is like 1 Cor 9:11, except there the imagery is reversed.

[16:12]  247 tn Or “faithful.”

[16:12]  248 tn Grk “have not been faithful with what is another’s.”

[16:12]  249 tn Grk “what is your own.”

[16:13]  250 sn The contrast between hate and love here is rhetorical. The point is that one will choose the favorite if a choice has to be made.

[16:13]  251 tn Or “and treat [the other] with contempt.”

[16:13]  252 tn Grk “God and mammon.” This is the same word (μαμωνᾶς, mamwnas; often merely transliterated as “mammon”) translated “worldly wealth” in vv. 9, 11.

[16:14]  253 sn See the note on Pharisees in 5:17.

[16:14]  254 tn A figurative extension of the literal meaning “to turn one’s nose up at someone”; here “ridicule, sneer at, show contempt for” (L&N 33.409).

[16:15]  255 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “but” to indicate the contrast present in this context.

[16:15]  256 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[16:15]  257 tn Grk “before men.” The contrast is between outward appearance (“in people’s eyes”) and inward reality (“God knows your hearts”). Here the Greek term ἄνθρωπος (anqrwpo") is used twice in a generic sense, referring to both men and women, but “men” has been retained in the text to provide a strong verbal contrast with “God” in the second half of the verse.

[16:15]  258 tn Or “exalted.” This refers to the pride that often comes with money and position.

[16:15]  259 tn Or “is an abomination,” “is abhorrent” (L&N 25.187).

[16:16]  260 tn There is no verb in the Greek text; one must be supplied. Some translations (NASB, NIV) supply “proclaimed” based on the parallelism with the proclamation of the kingdom. The transitional nature of this verse, however, seems to call for something more like “in effect” (NRSV) or, as used here, “in force.” Further, Greek generally can omit one of two kinds of verbs – either the equative verb or one that is already mentioned in the preceding context (ExSyn 39).

[16:16]  261 sn John refers to John the Baptist.

[16:16]  262 sn Until John; since then. This verse indicates a shift in era, from law to kingdom.

[16:16]  263 sn The kingdom of God is a major theme of Jesus. It is a realm in which Jesus rules and to which those who trust him belong. See Luke 6:20; 11:20; 17:20-21.

[16:16]  264 tn Many translations have “entereth violently into it” (ASV) or “is forcing his way into it” (NASB, NIV). This is not true of everyone. It is better to read the verb here as passive rather than middle, and in a softened sense of “be urged.” See Gen 33:11; Judg 13:15-16; 19:7; 2 Sam 3:25, 27 in the LXX. This fits the context well because it agrees with Jesus’ attempt to persuade his opponents to respond morally. For further discussion and details, see D. L. Bock, Luke (BECNT), 2:1352-53.

[16:17]  265 tn Or “one small part of a letter” (L&N 33.37).

[16:17]  266 tn Grk “to fall”; that is, “to drop out of the text.” Jesus’ point may be that the law is going to reach its goal without fail, in that the era of the promised kingdom comes.

[16:18]  267 sn The examples of marriage and divorce show that the ethical standards of the new era are still faithful to promises made in the presence of God. To contribute to the breakup of a marriage, which involved a vow before God, is to commit adultery. This works whether one gets a divorce or marries a person who is divorced, thus finalizing the breakup of the marriage. Jesus’ point concerns the need for fidelity and ethical integrity in the new era.

[16:19]  268 sn Purple describes a fine, expensive dye used on luxurious clothing, and by metonymy, refers to clothing colored with that dye. It pictures someone of great wealth.

[16:19]  269 tn Or “celebrated with ostentation” (L&N 88.255), that is, with showing off. Here was the original conspicuous consumer.

[16:20]  270 tn The passive verb ἐβέβλητο (ebeblhto) does not indicate how Lazarus got there. Cf. BDAG 163 s.v. βάλλω 1.b, “he lay before the door”; Josephus, Ant. 9.10.2 (9.209).

[16:20]  271 sn This is the one time in all the gospels that a figure in a parable is mentioned by name. It will become important later in the account.

[16:20]  272 tn Or “was covered with ulcers.” The words “whose body” are implied in the context (L&N 23.180).

[16:21]  273 tn Grk “to eat his fill,” but this phrase has been simplified as “to eat” for stylistic reasons.

[16:21]  274 tn The term κύνες (kunes) refers to “wild” dogs (either “street” dogs or watchdogs), not house pets (L&N 4.34).

[16:21]  275 sn When the dogs came and licked his sores it meant that he was unclean. See the negative image of Rev 22:15 that draws on this picture.

[16:22]  276 tn Grk “Now it happened that the.” The introductory phrase ἐγένετο (egeneto, “it happened that”), common in Luke (69 times) and Acts (54 times), is redundant in contemporary English and has not been translated.

[16:22]  277 tn Grk “to Abraham’s bosom.” The phrase “carried by the angels to Abraham’s bosom” describes being gathered to the fathers and is a way to refer to heaven (Gen 15:15; 47:30; Deut 31:16).

[16:22]  278 tn Grk “And the.” Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

[16:22]  279 sn The shorter description suggests a different fate, which is confirmed in the following verses.

[16:23]  280 sn The Greek term Hades stands for the Hebrew concept of Sheol. It is what is called hell today. This is where the dead were gathered (Ps 16:10; 86:13). In the NT Hades has an additional negative force of awaiting judgment (Rev 20:13).

[16:23]  281 sn Hades is a place of torment, especially as one knows that he is separated from God.

[16:23]  282 tn Grk “he lifted up his eyes” (an idiom).

[16:23]  283 tn Grk “in his bosom,” the same phrase used in 16:22. This idiom refers to heaven and/or participation in the eschatological banquet. An appropriate modern equivalent is “at Abraham’s side.”

[16:24]  284 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “so” to indicate the implied result of previous actions in the narrative.

[16:24]  285 tn Grk “calling out he said”; this is redundant in contemporary English style and has been simplified to “he called out.”

[16:24]  286 sn The rich man had not helped Lazarus before, when he lay outside his gate (v. 2), but he knew him well enough to know his name. This is why the use of the name Lazarus in the parable is significant. (The rich man’s name, on the other hand, is not mentioned, because it is not significant for the point of the story.)

[16:24]  287 sn The dipping of the tip of his finger in water is evocative of thirst. The thirsty are in need of God’s presence (Ps 42:1-2; Isa 5:13). The imagery suggests the rich man is now separated from the presence of God.

[16:24]  288 tn Or “in terrible pain” (L&N 24.92).

[16:24]  289 sn Fire in this context is OT imagery; see Isa 66:24.

[16:25]  290 tn The Greek term here is τέκνον (teknon), which could be understood as a term of endearment.

[16:25]  291 tn Or “in terrible pain” (L&N 24.92). Here is the reversal Jesus mentioned in Luke 6:20-26.

[16:26]  292 tn Grk “And in all these things.” There is no way Lazarus could carry out this request even if divine justice were not involved.

[16:26]  293 sn The great chasm between heaven and hell is impassable forever. The rich man’s former status meant nothing now.

[16:26]  294 tn Grk “between us and you.”

[16:27]  295 tn Here δέ (de) has been translated as “so” to indicate the rich man’s response to Abraham’s words.

[16:27]  296 tn Grk “he”; the referent (the rich man, v. 19) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[16:27]  297 tn Grk “Then I beg you, father, that you send him”; the referent (Lazarus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[16:28]  298 sn To warn them. The warning would consist of a call to act differently than their dead brother had, or else meet his current terrible fate.

[16:28]  299 tn Grk “lest they also come.”

[16:29]  300 tn Grk “says.” This is one of the few times Luke uses the historical present.

[16:29]  301 tn Or “obey”; Grk “hear.” This recalls the many OT texts calling for a righteous heart to respond to people in need (Deut 14:28-29; Isa 3:14-15; Amos 2:6-8; Mic 2:1-2; Zech 7:9-10).

[16:30]  302 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

[16:30]  303 tn Grk “he”; the referent (the rich man, v. 19) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[16:30]  304 sn If someone from the dead goes to them. The irony and joy of the story is that what is denied the rich man’s brothers, a word of warning from beyond the grave, is given to the reader of the Gospel in this exchange.

[16:31]  305 tn Here δέ (de) has not been translated.

[16:31]  306 tn Or “obey”; Grk “hear.” See the note on the phrase “respond to” in v. 29.

[16:31]  307 sn The concluding statement of the parable, they will not be convinced even if someone rises from the dead, provides a hint that even Jesus’ resurrection will not help some to respond. The message of God should be good enough. Scripture is the sign to be heeded.

[17:1]  308 tn Grk “He”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity. Here δέ (de) has not been translated.

[17:1]  309 sn See Luke 6:24-26.

[17:2]  310 tn This term refers to the heavy upper stone of a grinding mill (L&N 7.70; BDAG 660 s.v. μυλικός).

[17:2]  311 tn Grk “if a millstone were tied…and he were thrown.” The conditional construction in Greek has been translated by English infinitives: “to have… and be thrown.”

[17:2]  312 tn Or “to stumble.” This verb, σκανδαλίσῃ (skandalish), has the same root as the noun σκάνδαλον (skandalon) in 17:1, translated “stumbling blocks”; this wordplay is difficult to reproduce in English. It is possible that the primary cause of offense here would be leading disciples (“little ones”) astray in a similar fashion.

[17:3]  313 tn It is difficult to know if this looks back or forward or both. The warning suggests it looks back. For this verb, see Luke 8:18; 12:1, 15; 20:46; 21:8, 34. The present imperative reflects an ongoing spirit of watchfulness.

[17:3]  314 tn Both the “if” clause in this verse and the “if” clause in v. 4 are third class conditions in Greek.

[17:3]  315 tn Here the term “brother” means “fellow believer” or “fellow Christian” (cf. BDAG 18 s.v. ἀδελφός 2.a, contra BDAG 19 s.v. 2.c), but with a familial connotation. It refers equally to men, women, or children. However, because of the familial connotations, “brother” has been retained in the translation here in preference to the more generic “fellow believer” (“fellow Christian” would be anachronistic in this context).

[17:3]  316 tn Grk “And if.” Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

[17:4]  317 sn You must forgive him. Forgiveness is to be readily given and not withheld. In a community that is to have restored relationships, grudges are not beneficial.

[17:5]  318 tn Grk “And the.” Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

[17:5]  319 sn The request of the apostles, “Increase our faith,” is not a request for a gift of faith, but a request to increase the depth of their faith.

[17:6]  320 tn Here δέ (de) has been translated as “so” to indicate the implied result of previous action(s) in the narrative.

[17:6]  321 tn Grk “said.”

[17:6]  322 tn This is a mixed condition, with ἄν (an) in the apodosis.

[17:6]  323 tn Grk “faith as,” “faith like.”

[17:6]  324 sn A black mulberry tree is a deciduous fruit tree that grows about 20 ft (6 m) tall and has black juicy berries. This tree has an extensive root system, so to pull it up would be a major operation.

[17:6]  325 tn The passives here (ἐκριζώθητι and φυτεύθητι, ekrizwqhti and futeuqhti) are probably a circumlocution for God performing the action (the so-called divine passive, see ExSyn 437-38). The issue is not the amount of faith (which in the example is only very tiny), but its presence, which can accomplish impossible things. To cause a tree to be uprooted and planted in the sea is impossible. The expression is a rhetorical idiom. It is like saying a camel can go through the eye of a needle (Luke 18:25).

[17:6]  326 tn The verb is aorist, though it looks at a future event, another rhetorical touch to communicate certainty of the effect of faith.

[17:7]  327 tn Grk “Who among you, having a slave… would say to him.”

[17:7]  328 tn See the note on the word “slave” in 7:2.

[17:7]  329 tn Grk “and recline at table,” as 1st century middle eastern meals were not eaten while sitting at a table, but while reclining on one’s side on the floor with the head closest to the low table and the feet farthest away. See BDAG 70 s.v. ἀναπίπτω 1.

[17:8]  330 tn The question includes a Greek particle, οὐχί (ouci), that expects a positive reply. The slave is expected to prepare a meal before eating himself.

[17:8]  331 tn Grk “he”; the referent has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[17:8]  332 tn Grk “and gird yourself” (with an apron or towel, in preparation for service).

[17:8]  333 tn BDAG 423 s.v. ἕως 2.b, “to denote contemporaneousness as long as, while… w. subjunctive… Lk 17:8.”

[17:8]  334 tn Grk “after these things.”

[17:9]  335 tn Grk “did what was commanded.”

[17:9]  336 tn The Greek construction anticipates a negative reply which is indicated in the translation by the ‘tag’ at the end, “will he?” Thanks are not required.

[17:10]  337 tn Some translations describe the slaves as “worthless” (NRSV) or “unworthy” (NASB, NIV) but that is not Jesus’ point. These disciples have not done anything deserving special commendation or praise (L&N 33.361), but only what would normally be expected of a slave in such a situation (thus the translation “we have only done what was our duty”).

[17:10]  338 tn Or “we have only done what we were supposed to do.”

[17:11]  339 tn Grk “Now it happened that on.” The introductory phrase ἐγένετο (egeneto, “it happened that”), common in Luke (69 times) and Acts (54 times), is redundant in contemporary English and has not been translated.

[17:11]  340 sn This is another travel note about Jesus going to Jerusalem in Luke 9:51-19:48, the so-called “Jerusalem journey” section of Luke’s Gospel. It is not a straight line journey, because to travel along the Galilean and Samaritan border is to go east or west, not south to Jerusalem.

[17:11]  341 tn Grk “he”; the referent (Jesus) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[17:11]  342 tn Or “was traveling about.”

[17:12]  343 tn Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

[17:12]  344 tn The participle εἰσερχομένου (eisercomenou) is taken temporally.

[17:12]  345 sn The ten men with leprosy would have been unable to approach Jesus (Lev 13:45-46; Num 5:2-3). The ancient term for leprosy covered a wider array of conditions than what is called leprosy today. A leper was totally ostracized from society until he was declared cured (Lev 13:45-46).

[17:12]  346 tn Grk “leprosy, who.” Because of the length and complexity of the Greek sentence, the relative pronoun was replaced with a personal pronoun and a new sentence started at this point in the translation.

[17:13]  347 snHave mercy on us” is a request to heal them (Luke 18:38-39; 16:24; Matt 9:27; 15:22; 17:15; 20:31-32; Mark 10:47-49).

[17:14]  348 tn Καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

[17:14]  349 tn The participle πορευθέντες (poreuqente") is a good example of an adverbial participle of attendant circumstance. As such, it picks up the force of an imperative from the verb to which it is related (ExSyn 640-45).

[17:14]  350 sn These are the instructions of what to do with a healing (Lev 13:19; 14:1-11; Luke 5:14).

[17:14]  351 tn Grk “And it happened that as.” The introductory phrase ἐγένετο (egeneto, “it happened that”), common in Luke (69 times) and Acts (54 times), is redundant in contemporary English and has not been translated.

[17:15]  352 tn Grk “glorifying God.”

[17:16]  353 tn Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

[17:16]  354 tn Grk “he fell on his face” (an idiom for complete prostration).

[17:16]  355 sn And thanked him. This action recognized God’s healing work through Jesus.

[17:16]  356 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “now” to indicate the introduction of a parenthetical comment.

[17:16]  357 sn This is a parenthetical note by the author. The comment that the man was a Samaritan means that to most Jews of Jesus’ day he would have been despised as a half-breed and a heretic. The note adds a touch of irony to the account (v. 18).

[17:17]  358 tn Here δέ (de) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

[17:17]  359 tn Grk “Jesus answering said”; this is redundant in contemporary English and has been simplified in the translation.

[17:17]  360 tn The Greek construction used here (οὐχί, ouci) expects a positive reply.

[17:17]  361 tn The word “other” is implied in the context.

[17:18]  362 sn Jesus’ point in calling the man a foreigner is that none of the other nine, who were presumably Israelites, responded with gratitude. Only the “outsiders” were listening and responding.

[17:19]  363 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

[17:19]  364 tn Grk “to him”; the referent has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[17:19]  365 tn Or “has delivered you”; Grk “has saved you.” The remark about faith suggests the benefit of trusting in Jesus’ ability to deliver. Apparently the Samaritan benefited from the healing in a way the other nine did not.

[17:20]  366 tn The words “at one point” are supplied to indicate that the following incident is not necessarily in chronological sequence with the preceding event.

[17:20]  367 sn See the note on Pharisees in 5:17.

[17:20]  368 tn Grk “having been asked by the Pharisees.” The passive construction has been translated as an active one in keeping with contemporary English style, and the direct object, Jesus, has been supplied from the context.

[17:20]  369 sn The kingdom of God is a major theme of Jesus. It is a realm in which Jesus rules and to which those who trust him belong. See Luke 6:20; 11:20; 17:20-21.

[17:20]  370 tn Or “is not coming in a way that it can be closely watched” (L&N 24.48). Although there are differing interpretations of what this means, it probably refers to the cosmic signs often associated with the kingdom’s coming in the Jewish view (1 En. 91, 93; 2 Bar. 53—74). See D. L. Bock, Luke (BECNT), 2:1412-14, also H. Riesenfeld, TDNT 8:150.

[17:21]  371 tn This is a present tense in the Greek text. In contrast to waiting and looking for the kingdom, it is now available.

[17:21]  372 tn This is a far better translation than “in you.” Jesus would never tell the hostile Pharisees that the kingdom was inside them. The reference is to Jesus present in their midst. He brings the kingdom. Another possible translation would be “in your grasp.” For further discussion and options, see D. L. Bock, Luke (BECNT), 2:1414-19.

[17:22]  373 tn Here δέ (de) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

[17:22]  374 sn This is a reference to the days of the full manifestation of Jesus’ power in a fully established kingdom. The reference to “days” instead of “day” is unusual, appearing only here and in v. 26, but it may be motivated merely by parallelism with the “days” of Noah there and the “days of Lot” in v. 28.

[17:23]  375 tn Grk “And they will say.” The plural in Greek is indefinite, referring to people in general. Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

[17:23]  376 tn The words “he is” here and in the following clause are understood and have been supplied from the context.

[17:23]  377 sn Do not go out or chase after them. There will be no need to search for the Son of Man at his coming, though many will falsely claim its arrival.

[17:24]  378 sn The Son of Man’s coming in power will be sudden and obvious like lightning. No one will need to point it out.

[17:24]  379 tc Some very important mss (Ì75 B D it sa) lack the words ἐν τῇ ἡμέρα αὐτοῦ (en th Jhmera autou, “in his day”), but the words are included in א A L W Θ Ψ Ë1,13 Ï lat sy bo. On the one hand, the shorter reading is impressive because it has some of the best Alexandrian and Western witnesses in support; on the other hand, the expression ἐν τῇ ἡμέρα αὐτοῦ is unusual (found nowhere else in the NT), and may be considered the harder reading. A decision is difficult, but it is probably best to retain the words. NA27 rightly has the words in brackets, expressing doubt as to their authenticity.

[17:25]  380 sn The Son of Man’s suffering and rejection by this generation is another “it is necessary” type of event in God’s plan (Luke 4:43; 24:7, 26, 44) and the fifth passion prediction in Luke’s account (9:22, 44; 12:50; 13:32-33; for the last, see 18:32-33).

[17:26]  381 tn Here καί (kai) has not been translated because of differences between Greek and English style.

[17:26]  382 tn Or “as it happened.”

[17:26]  383 sn Like the days of Noah, the time of the flood in Gen 6:5-8:22, the judgment will come as a surprise as people live their day to day lives.

[17:27]  384 tn Grk “They.” The plural in Greek is indefinite, referring to people in general.

[17:27]  385 tn These verbs (“eating… drinking… marrying… being given in marriage”) are all progressive imperfects, describing action in progress at that time.

[17:27]  386 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

[17:27]  387 sn Like that flood came and destroyed them all, the coming judgment associated with the Son of Man will condemn many.

[17:28]  388 tn Or “as it happened.”

[17:28]  389 tn Grk “they.” The plural in Greek is indefinite, referring to people in general.

[17:29]  390 sn And destroyed them all. The coming of the Son of Man will be like the judgment on Sodom, one of the most immoral places of the OT (Gen 19:16-17; Deut 32:32-33; Isa 1:10).

[17:31]  391 sn Most of the roofs in the NT were flat roofs made of pounded dirt, sometimes mixed with lime or stones, supported by heavy wooden beams. They generally had an easy means of access, either a sturdy wooden ladder or stone stairway, sometimes on the outside of the house.

[17:31]  392 sn The swiftness and devastation of the judgment will require a swift escape. There is no time to come down from one’s roof and pick up anything from inside one’s home.

[17:32]  393 sn An allusion to Gen 19:26. The warning about Lot’s wife is not to look back and long to be where one used to be. The world is being judged, and the person who delays or turns back will be destroyed.

[17:33]  394 tn Or “tries to preserve”; Grk “seeks to gain.”

[17:33]  395 sn Whoever loses his life. Suffering and persecution caused by the world, even to death, cannot stop God from saving (Luke 12:4-6).

[17:34]  396 sn There is debate among commentators and scholars over the phrase one will be taken and the other left about whether one is taken for judgment or for salvation. If the imagery is patterned after the rescue of Noah from the flood and Lot from Sodom, as some suggest, the ones taken are the saved (as Noah and Lot were) andthose left behind are judged. The imagery, however, is not directly tied to theidentification of the two groups. Its primary purposein context is topicture the sudden, surprisingseparation of the righteous and the judged (i.e., condemned) at the return of the Son of Man.

[17:35]  397 tn Grk “at the same place.” According to L&N 46.16, this refers to a hand mill normally operated by two women.

[17:36]  398 tc Several mss (D Ë13 [579] 700 al lat sy) add (with several variations among these witnesses) 17:36 “There will be two in the field; one will be taken and the other left.” It is not well enough attested to be original. Further, it is an assimilation to the parallel in Matt 24:40, which marks the addition as secondary. The present translation follows NA27 in omitting the verse number, a procedure also followed by a number of other modern translations.

[17:37]  399 tn Here καί (kai) has been translated as “then” to indicate the implied sequence of events within the narrative.

[17:37]  400 tn Grk “they”; the referent (the disciples, v. 22) has been specified in the translation for clarity.

[17:37]  401 tn Grk “answering, they said to him.” This is redundant in contemporary English and has been simplified in the translation.

[17:37]  402 sn The question “Where, Lord?” means, “Where will the judgment take place?”

[17:37]  403 tn Or “corpse.”

[17:37]  404 tn The same Greek term can refer to “eagles” or “vultures” (L&N 4.42; BDAG 22 s.v. ἀετός), but in this context it must mean vultures, because the gruesome image is one of dead bodies being consumed by scavengers.

[17:37]  405 tn Grk “will be gathered.” The passive construction has been translated as an active one in English.



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